See Page XX – March 2014

Page XX logoSpring has arrived in London; birds are singing, flowers are blooming and even the sun has deigned to shine on us. Infused with the joys of the season, we’ve planted article seeds in people’s heads and can now show you what we’ve cultivated.

New in the shop this month are the conclusion to the Cthulhu Apocalypse setting, Slaves of the Mother, as well as the final edition of this year’s KWAS subscription about Lilith. There’s also a new Series Pitch of the Month club edition by ASH LAW. Articles this month include Simon’s View from the Pelgrane’s Nest, an article from Robin D. Laws about reducing the tendency towards violence in DramaSystem one-shots while Kenneth Hite teases us with Dracula Dossier titbits. Kevin Kulp is also looking at one-shots, but making TimeWatch better by avoiding gimmicks and; Gareth is helping you get clues to players more effectively and Kendall Jung talks about our Gen Con GMing plans.

Over in 13th Age corner, Casey Peavler and Ryven Cedrylle have been hard at work coming up with a whole series of new races, and one new class, while ASH LAW explains how to repurpose 4e monsters for 13th Age. Martin Killman has come up with some new barbarian talents, and Wade Rockett explains the special Pelgrane customer deal for the Midgard Bestiary.

New Releases

Articles

Resource page updates

  • Ashen Stars – Sam Carter has created a fillable, saveable Ashen Stars character sheet
  • 13th Age – A high-resolution Dragon Empire map is now available for download

13th Age

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4 Responses to “See Page XX – March 2014”

  1. Scott Jenks says:

    Earliest See Page XX ever? Nice treat for Friday, thanks.

  2. Ed says:

    I’d love a subscription, but don’t leave the FLGS in the cold! We need them and they need us!

  3. ErikPeter says:

    I love the 13th Age content! But come on, C. Peavler and R. Cedrylle, you can be a bit more original than that. Great work, but uncomfortably derivative. Eyebrow-raisingly.

    In contrastl M. Killman’s article sets a good example of how to use well-worn tropes in new and exciting ways.

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