13th Age Game Master’s Screen and Resource Book


The 13th Age GM’s Screen and Resource book is features incredible new art from 13th Age lead artists Aaron McConnell, Lee Moyer, a 32 page resource book and a fold out map of the Dragon Empire.

The screen is three-ply and portrait-oriented with all the essential information a GM needs to run the game.

The resource book includes advice on using terrain (including creating environments and locations that fit the different tiers of play), building battles, how to use icon rolls in practice (with examples), how to craft remarkable NPCs, a compilation of the existing GM guidance that’s currently spread across multiple existing 13th Age products, lengthy sections of GM advice will be condensed, with pointers  to the appropriate book to read more.

Lead Designer and Developer: Rob Heinsoo

Screen Art: Aaron McConnell, Lee Moyer

Writers: Cal Moore and Wade Rockett

Art Direction: Rob Heinsoo


The Forgotten Monk

The Forgotten Monk front cover_350A Man Without A Past

A novel of the 13th Age

Cipher is a monk: a master of the Deadly Arts, able to dismantle enemies using his bare hands. He is immune to lies, and can see volumes of information in the smallest detail.

Unfortunately, that’s all he knows. His real name, his history – all stolen by an unknown foe.

Without memory or purpose, Cipher can only follow his instinct to find bad people, and hit them until they stop doing bad things. Joining a crime-fighting cavalry unit in a remote corner of the Dragon Empire, he finds himself allied with a singing orc, an indecisive elf, and a flying carpet that doesn’t like heights. Together they’ll take on a crazy halfling death cultist, a love-maddened alchemist, a charming drunkard dog-thief, a blinded arch-demon in chains, and the bizarre Mantischorgoth.

The Forgotten Monk is high fantasy and high adventure, woven into a story of strong friendships, deadly hatreds, ingenious criminal mysteries and baffling affairs of the heart.

Download Chapter One in PDF format.

When you pre-order The Forgotten Monk, you get the EPUB, AZW3 and PDF version.

Stock #: SSP09 Author: Greg Stolze
Artist: Pat Loboyko Format: 288 page novel


Kroma Draconics

Kroma Draconics_350Start with anthropology fieldwork among the redscale barbarians of the Red Wastes. No, cancel that: the redscale dragonics ate the researchers. Restart with a dig into the myths and aspirations of dragonics influenced by chromatic dragons and the Three. The dig is dicey, but we expect to find monster stats, hierarchy options, adventure hooks, and player character options including feats, talents, and maneuvers.

Kroma Draconics is the ninth installment of the 13th Age Monthly subscription. It will be available to buy in the webstore in October. When you subscribe to 13th Age Monthly, you will get all issues of the subscription to date.


Stock #: PEL13AM10D Author: Rob Heinsoo, Cal Moore
Artist: Rich Longmore Type: 10-page PDF

13th Age Organized Play: September 2015 Update

13thAgeAllianceOnWhiteComing Soon

Keep watching the skies! Race to Starport, the first adventure in Season Two of 13th Age organized play, is coming in the next few days. Keep an eye out for the email—13th Age Monthly subscribers will be able to download it from their order page, and non-subscribers will receive a download link.

In this adventure the player characters discover a new threat, face strange beings banished to the stars in a previous age, and must race to stop a portal being created that will bring more monsters into the Dragon Empire.

Race to Starport is split into six two-hour sessions (for a total of 12 hours run time) and is designed for characters of levels 1 to 4. The accompanying Race to Starport Bestiary includes human bandits, new zombie types, cultists, and extradimensional horrors!

GM Perks

If you took our organized play survey a while back, and you live in North America, your gift is in the mail. We’re shipping the reward postcards now and you can expect to see them in the next 2-4 weeks (depending on location).

13th Sage: Why 13th Age Is A Good Gateway RPG

ROB_tileAn interviewer once asked us, “If someone has never played a tabletop RPG, why would 13th Age be a good game for them to try?”

Well, that interview never ran, so we’re going to share our answers here. We designed 13th Age for experienced GMs, but it can be a great entry point into the hobby for new players. Here’s why:

Jonathan: Number one: creativity. When new players try a tabletop RPG, they often get excited about the creativity and imagination that go into creating their characters. They’ll say things like, “I want to have a pet fire lizard like one from the Pern books,” or “I want to be a princess.” In other games, you can try to make these unusual features work somehow, but in 13th Age inventing unique traits for your character is built right into the rules. The system is flexible enough to accommodate oddball ideas without having to make them fit some pre-existing character template.

These days, computer games make it easy to create characters “by the book,” but only tabletop games really give you free-form, creative flexibility, and we really dialed up the creativity with 13th Age. A beginner will see right away that this isn’t just a computer game on paper.

Rob: The character’s “One Unique Thing” really goes over well with young players. “I’m the only person who can talk with birds,” said a 7-year old in a friend’s game. “I’m the Last of the Clockwork Knights,” said another friend’s 12-year old, who decided that 13th Age would be the first game his father would run for the family. Instead of telling new players, “No, that’s not what this game is about,” 13th Age starts with a half-designed world that asks players to help start the stories and background ideas that matter to them. The character who talks with birds ends up getting messages from the Game Master that couldn’t be delivered to anyone else. The clockwork knight turns out to be the last of the mechanical people we called forgeborn, but in this world they’re going to be called clockwork knights.

(Actually I’m not going to run games for beginners again without using the One Unique Thing, and I mean any game, not just 13th Age. To get new players seriously involved in a tabletop RPG quickly, check out our implementation of the One Unique Thing and apply it when you are running other games.)

Another great reason to start with 13th Age is that the game is grounded in the traditions of fantasy gaming and fantasy fiction. By providing players with the comfort of the familiar, along with various twists that inspire them to take things a step further, the game frees them to create exciting new stories.

A third reason to start with 13th Age is that we tried not to waste the reader’s time. Playing tabletop RPGs is the opposite of boring, but even some of the best RPGs have boring sections. If you take the time to read a page in 13th Age, we aimed to provide ideas, sentences, and small surprises that would make that time well spent. For examples of what I mean, look at the price list, the example of play, or the index. Even I feel silly saying that—who wants to look at those sections?  But we found ways to make even those pieces worthwhile.

13th Age combines the best parts of traditional d20-rolling fantasy gaming with new story-focused rules, designed so you can run the kind of game you most want to play with your group. Created by Rob Heinsoo and Jonathan Tweet, 13th Age gives you all the tools you need to make unique characters who are immediately embedded in the setting in important ways; quickly prepare adventures based on the PCs’ backgrounds and goals; create your own monsters; fight exciting battles; and focus on what’s always been cool and fun about fantasy adventure gaming. Purchase 13th Age in print and PDF at the Pelgrane Shop.

7 Icon Campaign

7 Icon Campaign front cover 350Start with a thought experiment: What would happen if we compressed the 13 icons into 7? Build on GM notes and player questionnaires from Jonathan’s 7-icon home campaign. Polish to a dangerous sheen with six new feats, spells, and talents inspired by the stories of the ‘new’ icons and usable in any 13th Age game.

7 Icon Campaign is the eighth installment of the 13th Age Monthly subscription. It will be available to buy in the webstore in August. When you subscribe to 13th Age Monthly, you will get all issues of the subscription to date.


Stock #: PEL13AM09D Author: Rob Heinsoo, Jonathan Tweet
Artist: Lee Moyer Type: PDF

Hidden Treasures

Treasure Mixed_VHFollowing on from my 2012 post about unappreciated Pelgrane products. I present to you two more such treasures, and my speculation as to why they are neglected.

The Gaean Reach RPG

“…this is a dead simple, easy to learn, quick to play science-fiction romp well worthy of a few evenings and weekends of your life.”

What it is: Across the vastness of the Oikumene a few individualGaean cover blogsizes of exceptional infamy project their lust for power. Fear of their names spreads from planet to planet like a cancer.None of these evokes greater loathing and terror than the world-spanning criminal mastermind Quandos Vorn. He is your nemesis, and you must defeat him.

Why it’s hidden: This game has been published almost solely because of my love of Jack Vance. I’m guessing now that most of you didn’t even connect the author of the Dying Earth with his SF setting called in general, The Gaean Reach. Perhaps I should have called it “Jack Vance, the writer of the Dying Earth, wrote SF books and this is the game about them.” Like most games based in an existing setting, there is an assumption that readers are expected to be familiar with it.

Why its a treasure: It’s a game with a unique premise – the players devise the most horrible, devious and grabby enemy they can, then set out to defeat that nemesis. It combines the wit and human foibles of the Dying Earth, with the GUMSHOE investigative system, with additions which make sure you don’t kill your nemesis (and she you) too early in the narrative. You don’t need any knowledge of the setting to play, though the setting is wonderful and in some cases creepy.

Read more here, or get it from the store.

13th Age Soundtrack

13a_soundtrack_cover_edited“It’s an amazing selection of music and I can’t see any gaming group not getting something out of it. More than anything, it’s unique; there are no movies, shows or games that have this music so the player’s will not have heard any of it before and will always equate it with their 13th Age games, or whatever ongoing RPG setting they’re gaming in. If that’s not perfect for a gaming group then I don’t know what is.”

What it is: a huge collection of music and sound loops for the 13th Age.

Why it’s hidden: This one is a puzzle. Maybe fantasy roleplayers don’t use music with their games as much as with other games types. Maybe our marketing has been remiss.

Why it’s treasure: an epic collection of music, soundscapes and loops which paint a huge Turner-like picture of the Dragon Empire, created with crazy professional standards an orchestration and live musicians. It’s beyond what many fully-fledged video games or movies would expect.  Listen and wonder!

Read more here, or get if from the store.

13th Age theme:

Dreams of a Lost Age:



“GLORIOUS!” Book of Loot Review, by Endzeitgeist

Endzeitgeist reviewed the Book of Loot on their website, giving it 5 stars, the Seal of Approval, and nominating it for the Top Ten of 2015! You can read the full review here. Thanks Endzeitgeist! Endzeitgeist says,

Book_of_Loot_cover“This book, much like the superb Bestiary of 13th Age, is more inspired than I ever believed it to be possible – the 
Book of Loot was NOT a book I looked forward to reading and when I did, I was continuously and constantly blown away – so much so, that I have used A LOT of the items herein – in 13th Age, PFRPG, DCC – their playfulness and imaginative potential is downright genius and they bring back a sense of the unpredictable, of the MAGICAL.”

“Author Gareth Ryder-Hanrahan delivers an absolutely stunning assortment of items that breathe narrative potential, that inspire, that actually feel like they could spring straight from the pages of your favorite fantasy novels, with the vast majority of them being able to support a story all on their own – or even a campaign. Add to that the novice-friendly advice in the beginning and we have a book that is a little masterpiece – it constitutes one of the best magic item books I’ve read since 2nd edition and brings back defining characteristics of what magic items can be – more than a sum of endlessly recombined numbers, bonuses and parts, more than just a mathematical bonus-machinery. And yes, there are such items herein, but ultimately, even these have some sort of component that makes them transcend their system-dependency. I consider this book an excellent buy for all d20-based systems and as such, this book receives 5 stars + my seal of approval and status as a candidate of my Top Ten of 2015 – a capable GM who understands the mechanics of 13th Age and another system can easily convert them. GLORIOUS!”


GM’s Screen – Portrait vs Landscape – who would win?

screenThere has been talk on our social media channels about the orientation of the 13th Age GM’s Screen. It’s going to be portrait, and I wanted to talk about that choice.

Our Keeper’s Screen for Trail of Cthulhu is three-fold and portrait-oriented. We’ve just reprinted it. Strangely, I have never had any push back or comments on the portrait vs landscape version Keeper’s Screen since it was released many years ago, so the comments were unexpected.

The first thing to say is that there are strong arguments for both – in fact, it’s purely a matter of taste. However, it’s a binary choice so it’s literally impossible for us to please both groups without doing two screens.

I chose vertical for the Keeper’s Screen because the primary purpose of a Keeper’s Screen is to hide the Keeper’s notes. Portrait screens do that job better. They have the downside of hiding more of the GM, but I don’t think that’s enough of a reason to make them landscape. From an aesthetic point of view, I think the potrait oriented screen has a more pleasing aspect ratio, closer to traditional triptychstriptych.

The same reasoning applies to the 13th Age GM’s screen.

This did lead me to wonder – am I in a minority? So, I contacted Danny O’Neill of Hammerdog Games, who produces the World’s Greatest Screen who offers both a landscape and a portrait version and has no skin the game.

He told me that portrait screens sell marginally better than landscape screens, but there’s not much in it. It’s a truly even split.

So what can you hardened Landscapers do? Well, one of our forum members has created a landscape-oriented screen you can print out here. And who knows, we might do a landscape version in future.

Now, with that dealt with, I’m waiting for the four-fold crowd to kick off.

“A superb, inspiring book”, review of 13th Age Bestiary

Endzeitgeist reviewed the 13th Age Bestiary, and even gave it the Seal of Approval! Thanks Endzeitgeist! You can read the full review here. Endzeitgeist says,
Screenshot 2015-08-13 at 3.59.12 PM
“From modifications of escalation or relationship dice to truly unique options, some of the abilities herein are, no hyperbole, GENIUS. Take the redcap. Tried and true delightfully evil fey – we all know and love the iron-shodded menaces. Well, herein, they have taboo-words – even if you *think* them, they get power from it and may teleport et al., gaining potentially a nasty array of additional actions. Now how is this represented? When a PLAYER says the taboo word, the ability kicks in. Yes. This is pretty much brilliant and can provide quite a mind-blowing experience when handled with care. This is just ONE example out of a bunch of them. This book’s abilities OOZE creativity and will enrich ANY d20-based game I run for years to come.”

“Rob Heinsoo, Ryven Cedrylle, Kenneth Hite, Kevin Kulp, Ash Law, Cal Moore, Steve Townshend, Rob Watkins, Rob Wieland – congratulations. You have actually managed to craft the first “Bestiary I” since the days of second edition I liked to *read*, the first that inspired me. This book manages what neither monster manuals of 3rd or 4th edition or PFRPG’s bestiary-line has succeeded in doing – actually inspire me to use creatures, to craft adventures around them, to use them to make the world feel more alive. While a rare few 3pp bestiaries over the years manage this sense of wonder, it usually stems from clever mechanics or uncommon concepts, only rarely from actual narrative potential. Ultimately, this book, in spite of its “1st bestiary”-handicap, did all of that and more and makes me giddy with anticipation and hopeful we’ll see more far-out creatures in the level of detail as provided herein.”