last doorEarlier this month, Phoenix Online Studios invited us to co-sponsor a short-short-short fiction competition to promote The Last Door Collector’s Edition. We’re all for creepy 8-bit Lovecraftian horror, and gladly joined in. Five prize winners got a Pelgrane PDF of their choice (and all of them chose either Trail of Cthulhu or Bookhounds of London); and 5 winners got a free copy of The Last Door.

Here are the winning entries for your enjoyment:

The 5 Pelgrane Press PDF winners:

She didn’t give me her name. I gave her mine. When she left the bar, she took it with her. – Paul Kirsch

Napping in a crowded metro, a whisper in my ear: don’t wake up. – Victor Ribeiro

“The ‘virus’ is an idea,” she said, “spread via sentence. It commands me to obey.” Chuckling, the doctor replied, “The ‘virus’ is an idea…” – Steven Marsh

As her hand slipped from my grasp, I marveled at its rate of descent compared to the other parts of her body. – Philip Gonzales

A step, drip, cold, door, dark. A step, twist, claw, fur, flare. It’s ok, you can’t see anything wrong. Or anything at all. A step. – Linda Evans

The 5 winners of copies of The Last Door:

I woke before dawn & warmed my shivering wife before returning to slumber. I woke again with a scream when I realized she died a year ago. – Brian Webb

He told me to get a bottle of wine from the cellar. I suppose that’s what he told the rest of these women to do, too. – Kyle Williams

Frightening was hungry eyes, watching me from the gloom. Terrifying was knowing I’d seen them before, every time I’d gazed into a mirror. – Noah Baxter

A bump, a creak, a faint rustle; all from me. I wait till you feel safe with these sounds. Then, as you sleep, I emerge from the shadows. – Gerry Bibaud

Slowly the words formed. We are legion it said. He stared at the readout from the quantum correlation encryption experiment. – Christian Mintert

13th Age at Origins 2014Many thanks to our GM team and all the players who attended our games at Origins this year. We sold out of all of our games, and even squeezed in some walk-ups in the scheduled games. Kendall Jung did an amazing job of managing our play events at the show. Onward to Gen Con!

Free RPG Day

Make Your Own Luck, Gareth Ryder-Hanrahan’s prequel to the upcoming Eyes of the Stone Thief campaign, is our contribution to this year’s Free RPG Day — you can get it on Saturday, June 21 at your nearest participating game retailer. We’ve heard that some stores are giving GMs their copies in advance so they can run the adventure on the day of release, so you might want to ring up your local store and see if they’ve scheduled a play event.

(Because some folks have asked: Free RPG Day is a retailer-sponsored event created to support game stores, so we’re not giving away PDF copies of the game.)

Make Your Own Luck: Live Play Crossover Event!

In much the same way that Nick Fury assembled the Avengers, for Free RPG Day we’ve assembled a team of players to play Make Your Own Luck via Google Hangout and Roll20 on Saturday, June 21st at 3:00 PM EST / noon Pacific:

Join us live on Aaron’s YouTube channel on Saturday, and watch the mayhem unfold.

Upcoming Adventures

Domain of the Dwarf King will go live soon. At Rob Heinsoo’s request it features a dwarf centipede. (I guess I know what Dutch horror movie Rob watched last night.)

Domain of the Dwarf King concludes the Orc War trilogy, and will see the final defeat of General Gul. Or not — that’s up to the adventurers.

The next big Organized Play installment after Domain of the Dwarf King is the first of our champion-tier games: Escape from the Diabolist’s Dungeon!

State of Play

We’e now up to 1186 GMs running Tales of the 13th Age worldwide, on every continent except Antarctica. If you know anybody in an Antarctic research station who wants a copy of 13th Age let us know!

by Wade Rockett

13th Age OP graph May 2014I’ll start this update by sharing a graph that ASH made, showing what almost a year of 13th Age Organized Play looks like in terms of GMs and sign-ups — click the image on the right to see it more clearly. The initial bump and flatish-line represents our pre-launch OP announcement. Once we went live we saw the numbers really start to go up.

I was going to use the rest of this post to list all 21 Gen Con games we’d scheduled, but THEY ALL SOLD OUT IN A HALF HOUR. Which is wonderful and amazing, because there was always the terrifying possibility that we’d underestimated demand for play and would end up struggling to fill our events. But the enthusiasm and support for 13th Age is greater than ever.

The good news for you is that we received a lot of GM applications after the deadline, so  expect to see a second wave of 13th Age games added to the schedule. We’ll let you know as soon as they go live.

13th Age Seminars at Gen Con: GM advice, design workshops & more

But maybe you’re interested in becoming a better 13th Age GM, or learning how to design adventures and monsters for the game? You’re in luck! We’re offering four seminars at Gen Con:

13th Age Adventure Design
Date & Time: Thursday at 1:00 PM
Duration: 1 hours
Location: Crowne Plaza : Pennsylvania Stn C
The freeform story rules in 13th Age require a different approach to adventure design. We’ll talk about how to design with icons, backgrounds, uniques and more, and answer your questions.

13th Age GM Roundtable
Date & Time: Friday at 3:00 PM
Duration: 1 hours
Location: Crowne Plaza: Grand Central D
Rob Heinsoo, Mike Shea, Ruth Tillman and Wade Rockett share their advice on how to run 13th Age, from handling icon rolls to collaborative world building and beyond. Got questions? Bring ‘em!

13th Age: Year One
Date & Time: Saturday at 3:00 PM
Duration: 1 hours
Location: Crowne Plaza: Victoria Stn A/B
13th Age debuted one year ago at Gen Con! Join Rob Heinsoo, Simon Rogers and Wade Rockett as they talk about where the game is now, share what’s coming next and answer your burning questions.

13th Age Monster Workshop
Date & Time: Sunday at 2:00 PM
Duration: 1 hours
Location: Crowne Plaza: Pennsylvania Stn C
Join 13th Age designers as they build a new monster that’ll take advantage of the game’s mechanics to deliver all sorts of nasty surprises at the table.

…also, check out Ken and Robin Talk About Stuff Live on Friday at 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM at the Crowne Plaza : Victoria Stn C/D

13th Age at Origins

We’re also running games at Origins Game Fair  June 11-15 —  download the Origins event grid.

13 True Ways Pit Fiend Tile SketchA 13 True Ways Preview

Chapter five of 13 True Ways is all about devils—those malevolent creatures from the Pit who delight in corrupting, binding and tormenting mortals. Where demons rage, devils persuade; where demons destroy, devils subvert and dominate.

Typically their role in your campaign depends on which icon you associate them with. If devils are most closely identified with the Archmage in your campaign, they are the servants and betrayers of wizards. If you prefer to tie them to the Elf Queen, they are haters and despoilers of beauty. If you choose to tie them to the High Druid, they work to transform the Wild into a desolate, industrial wasteland.

And then there are ideas that don’t follow the standard format tying the devils to icons. Some of these apply better to monstrous devils, and others work with the new covert devils you’ll find described for the first time in 13 True Ways.

Continue reading »

Elf Queen SketchBy ASH LAW

Our latest adventure is out: The Elf Queen’s Enchantment.

In this adventure the elves answer the call of the Dwarf King, marching west to aid in defeating the renegade orc warlord General Gul. The adventurers are called upon to act as wayfinders for the elven forces, being dropped ahead of the army by eagle riders to clear the way.

GMs: If you’re a Tales of the 13th Age GM, check your email to download The Elf Queen’s Enchantment. If you’re not in the program, sign up here!

Players: This 4th level adventure takes place simultaneously with Wrath of the Orc Lord and Domain of the Dwarf King, and intersects with those. Unless you have a character who has a compelling One Unique Thing that lets them be in more than one place at once you should play a different 4th level character than the one you used for Wrath of the Orc Lord.

Other News

Award time
As you have probably heard, 13th Age has been nominated for an Origins Award for best RPG!

Maps!
The maps from the current adventure and a lot of maps from the previous adventures can be found here.

GM of the Month
We asked our organized play GMs who deserves to win GM of the Month for the 2nd level adventures…

Who deserves to win GM of the Month for Wyrd of the Wild Wood?

You answered: Aaron Roudabush

Who deserves to win GM of the Month for Quest in the Cathedral?

You answered: Aaron Roudabush

Who deserves to win GM of the Month for Shadow Port Shuffle?

You answered: Ben Roby and Sarah Miller

This will be the 2nd win for team Roby-Miller, as they also won for Crown of the Lich King. You can read about it on their blog.

Until next time, stay awesome!

 

Tales of the 13th Age is the free ongoing organized play program for the 13th Age roleplaying game. You can play it anywhere you like: at home, your local game store, the neighborhood tavern…wherever. Sign up here to join.

13th Age icon symbolsby Wade Rockett

Greyhawk. Golarion. Eberron. Mystara. The names of these settings ring out in the history of roleplaying games. It’s no surprise that many 13th Age fans want to run campaigns in them, or others that are equally beloved. And one question comes up all the time: how do I figure out who the icons are in that setting? 

That was the project I undertook when I turned 13 powerful NPCs from the Midgard Campaign Setting into icons for the Midgard Bestiary by Kobold Press. Here’s what I learned: When you’re identifying the icons in a setting, whether it’s an existing product or your own homebrew campaign, focus on Connections, Goals, Geography and Flavor.

Connections

There’s only one mechanic for icons: relationship dice. This is the most important thing to understand about icons. They are all social by nature. A powerful dragon who spends all of his time in the heart of a mountain, sleeping on a mound of treasure, is not an icon. But a dragon who rules a city-state could be an icon, because she has followers, factions, allies, enemies and a need to employ adventurers.

This is important on a practical level because someone has to provide the benefit of an icon relationship roll to a player character, whether it’s gold, a magic item, a map, a copy of a key, a crew of henchmen, or valuable information. Even if the benefit comes in the form of a flashback, it’s still a flashback to a past interaction with a follower or foe of the icon. (Or at high levels, the icon itself.)

Goals

Here’s another reason that greedy dragon I mentioned isn’t an icon: he doesn’t have goals. All icons want something, and they use their power and influence to chase after that thing. Usually what they want gets in the way of something another icon wants, and that’s when the fun really starts. Goals make icons more than just vending machines for benefits — it makes them compelling and exciting additions to your campaign. If a setting’s NPC isn’t driven to accomplish or prevent something, they won’t be a very interesting icon.

Geography

An icon’s influence can span the globe, but most of them have a center of power somewhere. A few, such as Midgard’s Baba Yaga, are nomads who might turn up anywhere; but such beings aren’t the rule. (And adventurers are still more likely to find that cunning Feywitch in the Old Margreve forest than they are in the Southlands.)

When choosing the icons for your campaign, consider the extent to which an NPC’s influence is determined by geography. In 13th Age‘s default setting, the icons are most powerful and influential on their home turf, but their actions can affect events setting-wide. But not every setting includes people whose influence could be felt anywhere, no matter how far.

Depending on your comfort level, you can take one of two approaches here:

  • Decide where you want your campaign to take place, and choose icons based on which powerful NPCs with goals and followers could reasonably influence events in that place. For example, if your campaign takes place in and around a single city, your icons could be the ruler of the city, the local crime lord, the dwarf clan chief up in the nearby mountains, the northern barbarian king whose mercenaries fill the army’s ranks, the elf queen of the woods surrounding the city, and the scheming undead lord of a neighboring principality. If the city is important enough, faraway icons (even ones on other planes) could take an active interest in what happens there.
  • Present your players with all the possible icons in the setting, and have them decide which ones they want to be involved with. Then apply the above process in reverse, identifying a place where all these powers could be in play.

You can also use the involvement of icons who are distant, and their influence limited, to foreshadow that something important is going to happen that makes them want to have agents on the ground. If a baron sends assassins to kill a high priest on the other side of a continent, there must be a good reason he went to all that trouble. Maybe the baron has a direct interest in the affairs of church and state halfway around the world; or maybe he’s allied with, or being blackmailed by, a faction closer to where the PCs are based.

Flavor

Your choice of icons influences the type of campaign you’ll run, and which your players will play. Ask yourself whether making a particular NPC an icon helps to create the kind of game you’ll enjoy playing.

If the PCs never venture far from their city, but a distant sultana bent on conquest is an icon, it probably means her agents are in (or very near) the city, and your campaign will have a flavor of international intrigue. If the decadent, demon-summoning ruler of a slaver kingdom is an icon, you’ll focus heavily on the criminal and occult underworld — particularly smuggling, drugs, slavery and black magic.

How many?

You might be wondering how many NPCs to elevate to icon status. Five? Thirteen? More? Less?

Again, let’s look at practicalities. Just because you have 13 icons in a setting doesn’t mean that all 13 are going to be active in your campaign. And an even smaller number will play a major role in your adventures through successful icon relationship rolls. But in my experience, knowing that there are other powers striving and clashing in the world gives a setting depth, and makes it more dynamic. Even if things are relatively quiet in your neck of the woods, a mighty necromancer’s army might be steadily marching on a distant trade city — where a siege could mean a hungry winter for the dwarves in the North.

Me, I like to go with 13. It’s traditional, you know?

 

 

13AgeLogoFull-Transparentby Martin Killmann

Many types of barbarians roam the wilderness of the Dragon Empire, drawing on the power of ancestral spirits, draconic pacts, and even the mountains themselves to strike terror into their enemies’ hearts. Here are four sets of talents to build a distinctive barbarian who brings something unique to the battle.

Mountainheart

The Mountainheart are an ancient dwarven clan who chose to live on the surface when their homeland was destroyed during the war with the dark elves. Any barbarian can choose the following talents, but they are most commonly used by dwarves.

Mountainheart Adventurer Talents

Mountainheart

While raging, you can end your rage as a free action to negate all damage from one attack or effect.

Adventurer Feat: When you negate an enemy’s damage with this talent, your next attack against that enemy deals half damage on a miss.

Champion Feat: When you negate an enemy’s damage with this talent, make a saving throw (11+). If you succeed, your rage doesn’t end. For each point of relationship you have with the Dwarf King, you gain a +1 bonus to the roll.

Epic Feat: In addition to damage, you also negate all other effects of the attack.

Avalanche of Steel

Once per battle while you’re wielding a shield, you can make a shield smash melee attack as a quick action. Treat the shield as a d6 melee weapon. If you are not engaged with an enemy, you can move to a nearby foe before making the attack as a free action.

Adventurer Feat: When you hit with shield smash, make a Strength check against the enemy using a DC set by the tier. If you succeed, you can push the enemy against a wall, over a ledge, or into an obstacle, depending on your surroundings.

Champion Feat: Before making a shield smash attack, you can pop free from an enemy you are engaged with as a free action.

Epic Feat: When you score a critical hit with a shield smash attack, the target is also stunned until the end of its next turn.

Ancestral Shield

You start the game with a shield that was blessed in an ancestral temple. It is an adventurer-level true magic item with one of the following enchantments: protection, resilience, or termination. Only members of your bloodline can benefit from its effects.

While wielding the shield, you gain a +2 bonus to AC instead of the standard +1.

Quirk: Your shield houses the spirit of one of your ancestors. Its quirk is whatever quirk they had in life.

Adventurer Feat: The shield does not count against your maximum number of magic items.

Champion Feat: The shield is upgraded to a champion-level item, and the maximum hit point bonus increases.

Epic Feat: The shield is upgraded to an epic-level item, and the maximum hit point bonus increases.

Mountainheart Champion Talents

Giantslayer

Against large and huge enemies, increase your damage dice with heavy weapons to d12.

Once per round when a large or huge enemy hits you with a melee attack, you can make a hard saving throw (16+) to dodge the attack and turn it into a miss.

Champion Feat: When you dodge an attack with this talent, you can also make a melee attack against the attacker as a free action. If you score a critical hit with this attack, that enemy is hampered (save ends).

Epic Feat: You gain a bonus to your giantslayer saving throw equal to the escalation die. For each point of relationship you have with the Dwarf King, you gain an additional +1 bonus to the roll.

Mountainheart Epic Talents

Whirling Wall of Axes

When you hit with an opportunity attack against an enemy making a ranged attack or casting an attack spell, that attack misses. Spells without a miss effect simply fail. Note than when you use this talent once or twice in a battle, the smarter creatures will figure out that they need to disengage with you before taking those actions. Of course, this gives you an opportunity attack against them if they fail the check.

Epic Feat: When an enemy makes a successful saving throw to disengage from you, it still draws an opportunity attack from you. Your opportunity attack deals half damage. It doesn’t stop the creature from moving away from you.

 

Wyrmfang

These talents can represent gifts from the draconic icons, either the Three or the Gold Wyrm. They can also be a manifestation of draconic ancestry.

Wyrmfang Adventurer Talents

Wyrmtooth

Choose a sorcerer dragon breath spell of your level or lower. You gain a +1 bonus to the recharge roll of your dragon breath spell for each point of relationship you have with a draconic icon.

Adventurer Feat: You can use Constitution instead of Charisma for attack and damage with the spell.

Champion Feat: While you’re raging, your dragon breath spell gains the same benefit as your melee attacks—Roll 2d20 for the spell’s attack rolls. If both natural rolls are 11+, you score a critical hit.

Epic Feat: When you score a critical hit with a melee attack, if the escalation die is 5+ and you have your dragon breath spell available, you can use it as a free action.

Wyrmscales

Choose one dragon color. You gain the elemental resistance of that color (12+) but also the vulnerability (listed in brackets).

White: Cold (Fire)
Black: Acid (Thunder)
Green: Poison (Psychic)
Blue: Lightning (Force)
Red: Fire (Cold)

For each point of relationship you have with a draconic icon, increase your resistance by +1.

Adventurer Feat: You do not suffer the vulnerability when raging.

Champion Feat: Increase the base resistance to 16+.

Epic Feat: When taking damage of the type you are resistant to from this talent, make a saving throw (11+). If you succeed, you can heal using a recovery.

Eye of the Wyrm

You have been blessed with true seeing. You are immune to invisibility or illusion effects created by enemies of your level or lower.

Adventurer Feat: You can see in the dark as well as a normal human can in full daylight.

Champion Feat: You gain a +1 bonus to ranged attacks.

Epic Feat: Your ability to see arcane auras allows you to defend against magic. You gain a +2 bonus to your defenses against spells, magical close quarter attacks, breath weapons and magic traps.

Wyrmfang Champion Talents

Gift of the Blue

You gain a counterspell ability similar to blue dragons. When an enemy targets you with a spell, you can roll a hard save (16+); success means the spell has no effect on you. If the level of the spell is lower than your level, reduce the difficulty to a normal save (11+).

Champion Feat: When you successfully counter a spell, you can make a melee or ranged attack against the caster as a free action. The attack deals half damage.

Epic Feat: The above attack deals full damage instead. For each point of relationship you have with a draconic icon, the target takes +1d6 damage.

Wyrmfang Epic Talents

Wyrm Ascension

When you activate your barbarian rage, you transform into a normal-sized dragon. Your hands and teeth become d12 claw and fang natural weapons. You grow wings that allow you to fly. Your skin changes to scales that are equal to Heavy Armor (base AC 13), but incur no attack penalty.

Everything you are wearing or carrying—including clothes, weapons, armor, shields and magic items—magically vanishes when you take dragon form. They reappear when you resume your normal form.

Epic Feat: You have earned the respect of dragons. Roll twice on Charisma-based skill checks when interacting with dragons. If you have a positive relationship with a draconic icon, you gain this feat for free.

 

Graceful Fury

Elves are known for a graceful, controlled combat style. These talents are practiced by wild elves who embrace the ferocity of a cornered animal.

Graceful Fury Adventurer Talents

Ferocious Dance

When an enemy misses you with an attack, your first hit with a melee attack against that enemy before the end of your next turn deals an additional 1d8 damage.

Adventurer Feat: You gain a +4 bonus to all defenses against the first attack made against you each battle.

Champion Feat: Increase the bonus damage to 2d10.

Epic Feat: Increase the bonus damage to 3d12. For each point of relationship you have with the Elf Queen, you can reroll one of these damage dice.

Deadly Blur

While wielding a light or small weapon, you can use Dexterity for attack and damage, and your crit range with that weapon expands by 1.

Adventurer Feat: Add your Wisdom or Charisma modifier to your damage with all melee and ranged attacks. Your crit range with small and light weapons expands by 2. In addition, while your off-hand is free and you are not wearing armor, you gain a +1 bonus to AC.

Champion Feat: Double the damage bonus, expand the critical range by 3, and increase the AC bonus to +2.

Epic Feat: Triple the damage bonus, expand the critical range by 4, and increase the AC bonus to +3.

Venomous Sting

Once per day when you hit an enemy with a melee attack, the target also takes 10 ongoing poison damage.

Adventurer Feat: If the escalation die is 3+ when you use this talent, the target is also dazed (save ends both).

Champion Feat: Increase the ongoing poison damage to 30 if the escalation die is 3+. You can use the power one additional time per day for each point of relationship you have with the Elf Queen.

Epic Feat: Increase the ongoing poison damage to 50 if the escalation die is 5+.

Graceful Fury Champion Talents

Predator’s Gambit

As a standard action, you can allow one enemy engaged with you to make a melee attack against you as a free action. If the enemy chooses not to take the attack, you don’t benefit from the escalation die until the start of your next turn.

If the enemy’s attack misses, you can make a melee attack against that enemy as a free action. If your attack hits, you deal +1d10 extra damage for each point of the escalation die and the enemy is dazed until the end of its next turn.

Champion Feat: Add your Wisdom or Charisma modifier to all defenses against the attack. If the enemy’s attack hits, you take only half damage.

Epic Feat: When your Predator’s Gambit attack hits, you can choose to make the target confused instead of dazed until the end of its next turn.

Graceful Fury Epic Talents

Death is Swift and Beautiful

Once per day, when you start raging, your next melee attack that turn targets 1d4+1 nearby enemies. You pop free of each foe you attack and can move to the next one as a free action.

Epic Feat: You can also attack far away targets with the attack.

 

Tribal War Chief

These talents are found in barbarians who have been chosen to lead their people, be it by birth, merit, or the will of the gods.

Tribal War Chief Adventurer Talents

Heirloom Armor

You start the game with a set of heavy armor inherited from your ancestors, a true magic item. Choose between the heedlessness, splendor and warding adventurer-level enchantments. Only you can benefit from the item’s enchantment.

You do not take an attack penalty while wearing heavy armor.

Quirk: You tend to make dramatic speeches, and swear mighty oaths.

Adventurer Feat: The item does not count against your magic item limit.

Champion Feat: The item is upgraded to champion level.

Epic Feat: The item is upgraded to epic level.

Voice of the War Chief

Choose a Battle Cry of your level or lower from the bard’s list. You gain this Battle Cry as a class power.

Adventurer Feat: You gain a second Battle Cry.

Champion Feat: When using a Battle Cry, both you and one ally benefit from it.

Epic Feat: Once per day, you and each ally who can hear you can benefit from your Battle Cry.

Tribal War Chief  Champion Talents

The Pack Circles the Prey

When you score a critical hit against an enemy, the crit range of each of your allies attacks expands by 4 against that target until the start of your next turn.

Champion Feat: The target takes a cumulative –1 penalty to its next attack for each hit it takes before its next turn.

Epic Feat: The target is hampered until the start of your next turn; and, if they’re a creature that can normally use recoveries, cannot use recoveries until the start of your next turn.

Monks FightingBy Brian Slaby

Dicey Stunts is an expansion of the “Dicey Moves” section of the 13th Age core rule book, which allows for any character to exercise their narrative creativity during combat — much like a Rogue with the Swashbuckle talent. (If they succeed at an appropriate skill check, of course!)

Talents such as Swashbuckle, Vance’s Polysyllabic Verbalizations, and Terrain Stunt have gotten a lot of praise from fans of 13th Age.  These open-ended, player-driven abilities reflect the spirit of this system very well, just like Backgrounds, Icon Relationships, and the One Unique Thing.

The Dicey Stunts rule provides guidance for all players to use improvisational “stunts” — not just those who picked certain talents.  It also gives players of the simpler classes (barbarian, paladin, and ranger) an opportunity to spice up combat and play more tactically.

HOW DICEY STUNTS WORK

A Stunt is whatever the player would like to achieve.  The options below should cover a wide variety of possibilities, with the mechanics reflecting the intent of the action.  The intended effect can be described in whatever narrative way that the player sees fit.

Stunts are usually a quick action skill check, but some of the more impressive effects require a standard action.

Risks are consequences chosen by the GM.  If the skill check for the Stunt fails, then the Risk is triggered.

Any quick action Stunt can be used as a standard action to avoid a Risk.

The skill check DC is usually based on the standard difficulty for the environment. If the action directly opposes an opponent, use their PD or MD instead.  For simplicity, targeting PD or MD is equivalent to a Normal difficulty.  If the action would normally be a Hard difficulty, add 5 to PD/MD.

STUNTS

Combat Maneuver (quick action): Make a skill check (usually Str or Dex) against your opponent’s PD (usually).

Examples:

Trip - The target is Prone.  They can stand up as part of their move action, but must succeed at a Normal Save to reach their intended destination (Hard or Easy Saves can be used for relatively further or closer destinations).

Bull Rush - The target is pushed back a few feet, popping them free of any engagements except the bull rusher (and potentially pushing them into new engagements).  If pushing the target into dangerous terrain (fire, off of a cliff, etc.) then you must hit PD+5 (equivalent to a Hard DC).  If the target is Large or Huge, add an additional +5 to the DC (so it’s Very Hard to push a larger creature into dangerous terrain).

Grapple - The target takes a -2 penalty to disengage checks (you must have at least one hand free to initiate a Grapple).

Gain the Advantage (quick action):  Make a skill check against the target’s MD or PD, or use the Normal DC for the environment.  Choose 1 of the following effects (or similar), which lasts until the end of your next turn:

  1. The target is Vulnerable
  2. You or 1 ally gains a +2 bonus to attack rolls against the target
  3. You or 1 ally gains a bonus to damage against the target equal to your level.

Players that really like to gamble may want a stronger effect.  Feel free to give it to them, but with a Hard DC (or add +5 to PD/MD).  Instead, they may choose from these effects:

  1. The target is Dazed
  2. The target is Hampered
  3. Choose one of the Normal DC effects, and make it Save Ends.

Examples:  Taunting the opponent, throwing sand in his eyes, feinting, using footwork to improve your relative positioning, etc.  This is very much a catch-all category.

Attack the Masses (standard action):  First, make a skill check (Hard DC) with an ability appropriate to the action you’re describing.  If successful, you can make a basic attack against 1d3 nearby enemies in a group (whether it’s a melee or ranged attack depends on how you describe the action).

 Examples: Sweep attack, cutting/shooting the rope of a chandelier so it falls on your enemies, throwing a table at your enemies, etc.

Increase Momentum (standard action): Describe how you’re increasing the momentum of the battle and then roll a skill check with an appropriate ability (Normal DC).  Immediately raise the escalation die by 1 on a success.  This is limited to 1 attempt per battle.

RISKS

Counter-attack:  One enemy (usually the target, but a ranged enemy works well too) makes an immediate basic attack against the gambling character.  If it makes more sense that the action would endanger an ally, then an ally can suffer the counter-attack (this will usually only happen if the character that took the gamble is in a fairly safe position).

Vulnerable:  The character is Vulnerable (Hard Save Ends).

Backfired:  Something went wrong, and now the character is either Dazed or Stuck (Save Ends).

Lost Momentum:  Decrease the escalation die by 1.  This should usually be a pretty dramatic event, so you shouldn’t overuse it (in other words, don’t do it more than once per battle, but see Increase Momentum).

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

A previous version of this system was originally posted to my blog under the name The Mazarbul Gamble.  Much credit goes to quinn on the Thought Crime blog for his Gamble! stunt system, which provided the basic framework for failed skill checks triggering a Risk.  This idea is so important in keeping players from “spamming” stunts and bogging down combat, while still being forgiving enough that cool stunts are a viable option for anyone.

 

13th Age cleric detailBy Mark Craddock

13th Age and the Archmage Engine that drives it has become the clear frontrunner for most of my gaming needs since I got in on the Second Escalation Edition.  However, I run many games for both my kids and new players, and sometimes I want something leaner.  That’s how I came to mix Dan Porter’s excellent OSR product Labyrinth Lord with the sensibilities of the Archmage Engine.

In play, most things work as they do in 13th Age:  saves, the escalation die, backrounds, one unique things. (But see below for recoveries.) And for simplicity, weapon and armor selection are purely cosmetic: your class or race dictates your defenses and damage output, unless you get a cool magic item.  Most classes go to 10th level with some only going to 9th.

Spells, magic items and foes are used as they appear in Labyrinth Lord.

Cleric

Requirements: None

Hit Points per Level: 6 + Con mod per Level

Maximum Level: 10

Initiative: Dex mod + Level

Armor Class (no armor): 10 + middle mod of Con/Dex/Wis + Level

Armor Class (armor): 14 + middle mod of Con/Dex/Wis + Level

Armor Class (shield and armor): 15 + middle mod of Con/Dex/Wis + Level

Physical Defense: 11 + middle mod of Str/Con/Dex + Level

Mental Defense: 11 + middle mod of Int/Wis/Cha + Level

Backgrounds: 8 points, max 5 in any one background

Melee Attack
Attack: Strength + Level vs. AC
Hit: 1D6 + Str Mod
Natural Hit of 16+: +2 to your next melee attack

Ranged Attack
Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC
Hit: 1D4 + Dex Mod

Destroy Undead
Target: 1d4 nearby undead creatures
Attack: Wisdom + Charisma + Level vs. MD
Hit: 2D4
Natural Even Hit:  Target is dazed (-4 penalty to attacks) until the end of your next turn

Holy Light  (Optional, and assumes recovery rules are not being used)
Uses: 2 times per day
Target: All nearby allies
Effect: Heal 1d6+2 hit points

Divine Inspiration:  Worshiping their god allows a cleric to cast spells in their god’s name. A cleric my cast any spell on the cleric spell list as long as it is not higher than their current level.

Thaumaturgy: Because clerics’ spells are granted by their gods, they do not need to learn them. If their gods wish them to have access to a spell, they simply do. Clerics cannot cast a spell that is higher than their cleric level.

At 1st Level a cleric may cast level 1 spells

At 2nd Level a cleric may cast level 2 spells

At 3rd Level a cleric may cast level 3 spells

At 4th Level a cleric may cast level 4 spells

At 5th Level a cleric may cast level 5 spells

At 6th Level a cleric may cast level 6 spells

At 7th Level a cleric may cast level 7 spells

When clerics cast a spell, they make a hard (DC 16) save.  Note this DC can be adjust to 11 or even 6 if the GM feels that circumstances are particularly important to a cleric’s god.

If the cleric succeeds on her save, the spell is cast and she may recast that same spell again that day. When recasting a spell, she repeats the process above with the same two possible results.

If the cleric fails the save, the spell is cast, but that spell may not be cast again that day.

Example: If Sasha Bluth, a vicar of the Priestess, casts Light and rolls an 18 on his save, he may recast it as soon as the next round.  If the roll of his second save is a 20 when recasting Light he can recast it a third time that day.  However, if the roll of his third save to recast Light is a 14, the spell is cast but is no longer available to the cleric that day and requires Sasha to devote six hours of uninterrupted prayer to the Priestess before he may cast it–or any other spell he failed to save against while casting–again.

Devotion and spellcasting:  If a cleric ever falls from divine favor due to violating the precepts of her god or breaking the rules of her priestly vocation, her god may withdraw her ability to cast spells. Whenever a cleric who has displeased her god casts a spell, that spell is no longer available to her for the rest of the day as if she had failed her save. Additionally, she must spend six hours in prayer and meditation to give her full access to all of her spells.

See Labyrinth Lord for the 1st Age cleric’s spell list. For a more traditional Vancian system, use the Labyrinth Lord spell progression chart for the cleric.

Healing and recoveries in the 1st Age: By default, 1st Age treats the cleric’s healing abilities as they appear in Labyrinth LordCure spells are merely another resource open to the class, which has no special healing tools beyond that. This approach assumes that PCs in your campaign do not have access to recoveries — the self-healing mechanic in  13th Age.  The Holy Light ability is ideal for groups that enjoy a play style where the cleric is the party healer who often stands between the adventurers and death.

If a group does want to include recoveries in the game, one option is to give each character four recoveries per day. These recoveries heal each class for their hit points per level (without Con mod), and may be used once per battle or freely while out of combat. If one or more PC clerics are present during a battle, each party member in the battle gets a second in-combat use of a recovery.

Another option if you’re not using recoveries: allow the cleric to grant “fast healing” to her allies. During combat in which the cleric is present, any party member in the battle who is below half their hit point maximum heals two hit points per round until they return to half their maximum hit points. Outside of combat, a cleric’s presence in the party allows each member to heal 1d6+1 hit points per day of rest, instead of 1d3.

Citadel: At 6th level a cleric may establish or build a citadel.So long as the cleric is currently in favor with his god, he may buy or build a keep at half the normal price due to divine intervention. Once a citadel is established, the cleric’s reputation will spread and he will attract 1st and 2nd level followers of the fighter class (numbering 5d6 x10) that are completely loyal. The GM chooses which proportions of followers are bowman, infantry, etc.

You can find more 1st Age material at Mark Craddock’s Cross Planes blog.

The 1st Age Cleric text in this article is Open Game Content, as defined in the Open Gaming License version 1.0a Section 1(d).

by Paul Fanning

When Paul sent us this larger-than-life character class he said, “A Fighter can accomplish many great deeds, fighting more fearsome foes and saving villages then regions then the world. But the Fighter is also essentially an action movie hero: more skilled than the average warrior or soldier, a little luckier, with grit and resolve that carry him through. He relies on himself, his sword, and his allies and wins the day. But, if the stories are to be believed, he is no Hercules, Achilles, Beowulf… or Mordred. These are characters with explicitly superhuman capabilities, often with a direct connection to the Icons of their land. 13th Age also has a spot open for a tough character with caster-like resource management. So the Stalwart was born.”

What do you think of the stalwart? Join the discussion on the Pelgrane Forums.

Stalwart

OVERVIEW
Stories tell of some champions who serve or oppose the Icons—not through “borrowed” spells or magic; nor through mortal grit, training, or luck; but from a seemingly inherent supernatural strength, stamina, and force of arms. These stories (the mostly true ones, anyway) are talking about the Stalwart.

A Stalwart might be the blood relative of an Icon or fearsome monsters like giants . They may have been enchanted at infancy,  blessed after a unique initiation, or returned from seeming death with renewed purpose and power. Other stalwarts are brought by the Icons seemingly from nowhere, from across the sea or beyond the wastes, to join in their conflicts. And many say that the attention of an Icon can warp reality to create a Stalwart—that the belief that there exists a person who champions or threatens that Icon can empower a being to make it so.

Play Style:
The Stalwart is a bit of a challenge to play thanks to Greatness powers that depend heavily on whether you last hit an enemy or were hit yourself, as well as the management of the many Stalwart powers that are daily or recharge resources. The class can be very engaging for the player who wants a “tough” character with a lot of choices during play.

Ability Scores: You need Strength and Constitution for the deeds of might and endurance you can perform. Some Stalwart attacks also reward high Dexterity.

The Stalwart gain a +2 class bonus to Strength or Constitution, as long as it isn’t the same ability you increase with your +2 racial bonus.

Races: Humans are the most common race for a Stalwart, which is fitting for such a seemingly mundane (to some) race that seems to have an undue(to many) influence over Icons and the world… and human adventurers seem almost likely to bear the blood or influence of something other than strictly humanoid.  Dwarves also have their share of stalwarts: some of the songs and lore telling of the absurd deeds of Dwarven warriors battling giants are actually true. Perhaps due to their unusual origins, members of the optional races have a high proportion of Stalwarts allied with or opposed to the Icons that are their alleged progenitors.

Backgrounds: Child of giants, enchanted by the Sorceress that raised you, warrior from across the sea, raised as the child of a god, commander of an imperial legion, infamous killer.

Icons: Like any adventurer, a Stalwart may feel the influence of any Icon. Traditionally, however, it is the Archmage, the Crusader, the Dwarf King, the Emperor, the Lich King, the Priestess, and the Three that empower the Stalwart. The Archmage, and those before him,  has been said to deliberately create Stalwarts he believes will do his work on the battlefield, while the Archmage toils in magic and isolation. Seeing threats everywhere, the Crusader is likely responsible for his share of Stalwarts who oppose him — though the fact that there are Stalwarts devoted to and seemingly empowered by the peaceable Priestess makes as much of a case for Icons creating Stalwarts unwillingly. The Dwarf King and the Emperor have feelings on Stalwarts similar to each other, hoping that “their” Stalwarts have no aspirations to the respective Icons crowns and are content battling their enemies. Stalwarts connected to the Lich King are said to be terrible things, bringers of death who may be unable to die.

 

Stalwart Armor and AC

Type Base AC Atk Penalty

None      11               -

Light       13              -

Heavy      15           -2

Shield       +1             –

Weapons
Melee Weapons

One-Handed                                   Two-Handed

Small                     1d4 dagger                                      1d6 club

Light or Simple    1d6 hammer, shortsword             1d8 spear

Heavy or Martial 1d8 longsword, warhammer      1d10 greatsword, greataxe

Ranged Weapons

                           Thrown                 Crossbow                                      Bow

Small                  1d4 dagger           1d4 hand crossbow (-2 atk)      —

Light or Simple 1d6 javelin           1d6 light crossbow (-2 atk)        1d6 shortbow

Heavy Martial   —                          1d8 (–2 atk) heavy crossbow    1d8 longbow

STALWART LEVEL PROGRESSION

Stalwart Level Total Hit Points Total Feats Powers Known Pool Available Level Up Ability Bonuses Damage Bonus From Ability Score
Level 1 (8 + CON mod)x3 1 adventurer 4 1ST level ability modifier
Level 2 (8 + CON mod)x4 2 adventurer 5 1ST level ability modifier
Level 3 (8 + CON mod)x5 3 adventurer 5 3rd level ability modifier
Level 4 (8 + CON mod)x6 4 adventurer 6 3rd level  +1 to 3 abilities ability modifier
Level 5 (8 + CON mod)x8 4 adventurer, 1 champion 6 5TH level 2 x ability modifier
Level 6 (8 + CON mod)x10 4 adventurer, 2 champion 7 5TH level 2 x ability modifier
Level 7 (8 + CON mod)x12 4 adventurer, 3 champion 7 7TH level  +1 to 3 abilities 2 x ability modifier
Level 8 (8 + CON mod)x16 4 adventurer, 3 champion, 1 epic 8 7TH level 3 x ability modifier
Level 9 (8 + CON mod)x20 4 adventurer, 3 champion, 2 epic 8 9TH level 3 x ability modifier
Level 10 (8 + CON mod)x24 4 adventurer, 3 champion, 3 epic 9 9TH level  +1 to 3 abilities 3 x ability modifier

 

STALWART STATS

Initiative, AC, PD, MD, Hit Points, Recovery Dice, Feats, and some Talents are level dependent.

Ability Bonus +2 Strength or Constitution (different from racial bonus)
Initiative Dex mod + Level
Armor Class (light armor) 13 + middle mod of Con/Dex/Wis + Level
Physical Defense 11 + middle mod of Str/Con/Dex + Level
Mental Defense 10 + middle mod of Int/Wis/Cha + Level
Hit Points (7 + Con mod) x Level modifier (see level progression chart)
Recoveries (probably) 8
Recovery Dice (1d10 x Level) + Con mod
Backgrounds 8 points, max 5 in any one background
Icon Relationships 3 points
Talents 3
Feats 1 per Level

Gear

At 1st level, stalwarts start with a melee weapon or three, a ranged weapon or two if they want them, possibly some armor, and standard nonmagical gear that is suggested by the character’s backgrounds.

Stalwarts in direct service or opposition to an icon start with 25 gp in savings. Those trying to make their own way start with 1d6 x 10 gp.

Melee attack

At-Will

Target: One enemy

Attack: Strength + Level vs. AC

Hit: WEAPON + Strength damage

Miss: Damage equal to your level

Ranged attack

At-Will

Target: One enemy

Attack: Dexterity + Level vs. AC

Hit: WEAPON + Dexterity damage

Miss: Damage equal to your level

CLASS FEATURES

Greatness
Greatness represents the belief in your power during the ups and downs of battle. Many of the stalwart’s powers function only when the stalwart has greatness. Greatness is either on or off– you either have greatness, or you don’t. The default is that you do not start a battle with greatness.

You gain greatness when you are hit by an enemy attack.

You lose greatness when you miss all enemies with an attack. You also lose greatness when you become unconscious, and when a battle ends.

The default is that you can use greatness powers without losing greatness, but a few powers specify that you must spend your greatness to use them. You don’t have to use attacks that require greatness against the foe you hit to gain that greatness.
Greatness powers that do not require you to spend your greatness are generally classified as interrupt actions. You can only use one interrupt action a round, which keeps your greatness powers from dominating the battle.

Empowered by Fate
You gain 1 relationship point with the Archmage, the Crusader, the Dwarf King, the Emperor, the Lich King, the Priestess, or the Three; you choose whether the point is positive, conflicted, or negative. This point can add to your normal relationship points but you can’t exceed the normal relationship maximums with it. (Remember that positive relationships with villainous icons like the Lich King or the Three are limited to 1 point).

When an ally rolls a 5 or a 6 on an icon relationship roll with the Icon(s) this feature gave you a relationship point with, start the next turn in battle with greatness.

Adventurer Feat: When you roll a 5 or a 6 on a relationship roll with the icon from this feature, start the next round in battle with greatness.
Champion Feat:
Gain another relationship point with one of the above icons. As above, you must follow the relationship maximums.
Epic Feat: Gain another relationship point with one of the above icons. This point can exceed the relationship maximums.

Strength of Many
You can lift twice and support about as much weight as two otherwise identical creatures normally can, and can move normally while carrying about your own weight (or twice your weight total). You also gain the use of power stunt.

Power stunt: At the start of each battle, roll a d6. Any time after the escalation die reaches that number, you’ll be able to use a quick action to spend your greatness and execute a power stunt. Normally you can only use power stunt once per battle, but circumstances, geography, or excellent planning may suggest that you can pull it off more than once.

Power stunts are improvisational effects that play off your preternatural strength. Things like muscling an enemy out of your may or leaping over the head of that enemy, knocking a stalactite onto your opponent, forcing a foe onto a soggy patch of ground that slows them down, wedging your enemy’s sword into a stone floor, busting open a barrel of lamp oil into the eyes or under the feet of incoming foes, shaking the tree that brings the sniper that thought he was out of reach crashing down to earth, etc. Power stunt effects are something any strong character might be able to accomplish, except you do not to make a check while using power stunt. Gaining increased strength by spending feats on this feature may allow you to describe more incredible effects for power stunt, affecting more or larger foes.

Adventurer Feat: You instead lift, support, and move normally with a total of about five times the normal amount. Also, roll an additional d20 for power stunt (any time after the escalation die reaches that number, gain an additional use of power stunt this battle).
Champion Feat:
You instead lift, support, and move normally with a total of about ten times the normal amount. Roll an additional d12 for power stunt instead of a d20.
Epic Feat:
You instead lift, support, and move normally with a total of thirty or more times the normal amount.  Roll an additional d6 for power stunt instead of a d12.

Unarmed Attacks
Stalwart unarmed attacks are light/simple weapons that do 1d6 plus any applicable modifiers.

Champion Feat: When your natural melee attack roll equals the number currently showing on the escalation die, you can make an immediate basic unarmed melee attack against the same enemy as a free action.

CLASS TALENTS

COLOSSAL STAMINA
Your base hit points are now 8.
Adventurer Feat: Your recovery dice are d12s while you have greatness.
Champion Feat: Your recovery dice are always d12s.

CONFIDENCE
You are always affected by fear effects as if you were at full HP, and gain greatness when you successfully resist a fear effect.
Adventurer Feat: Gain a +2 to MD.

EMPOWERED BY THE EARTH
The relationship granted by Empowered by Fate may now be with the High Druid. You gain the Elementalist feature Elemental Bond and may improve it with feats up to your tier. In addition, you may select one Elementalist power of your level or lower instead of a Stalwart power. You may improve this power with feats normally.

Adventurer Feat: You may change any elements from the Elementalist class that you possess to use Constitution instead of Wisdom.
Champion Feat: You gain the Elemental Manipulation class feature, and may improve it with feats up to your tier.
Epic Feat: You gain an additional Elementalist power of your level or lower and may improve it.

GODSLAYER
When you hit an enemy that has more hit points than you with an attack, increase the damage of that attack by their level.

Champion Feat: Once per battle, instead increase the damage by twice their level.
Epic Feat:
Once per day, instead increase the damage by five times their level.

LEGION OF ONE
When you are hit by an attack from an enemy with fewer hit points than you, reduce that attacks damage by your level.

Champion Feat: Once per battle, instead reduce the damage by twice your level.
Epic Feat: Once per day, instead reduce the damage by five times your level.

LIMBS OF IRON
You use strength rather than dexterity when determining AC in no armor, when making ranged weapon attacks and when using stalwart powers.

STRIDE THE WORLD
You gain resistance 16+ to two of Cold, Fire, or Poison. You are vulnerable to the other type.

Adventurer Feat: You lose the vulnerability.

TITAN GRAPPLE
You can grab a creature using the normal grab rules, with a successful strength+level vs. PD attack as a standard action.

Adventurer Feat: If you wish, you move and are moved when grabbed or grabbing as if you were one size larger.
Champion Feat:  If you wish, instead you move and are moved when grabbed or grabbing as if you were two sizes larger.
Epic Feat: If you wish, you can move any creature when grabbing it, and cannot be moved by any creature grabbing you.

WEAPONS OF GIANTS
You wield, forge, or improvise oversized weapons. While you have greatness, increase your weapon and unarmed damage dice by one step.

Champion Feat: Instead, increase your weapon and unarmed damage dice by one step whether or not you have greatness.

POWERS

1ST LEVEL POWERS

HORIZON THROW
Ranged attack
At-will
Special: When the escalation die is even, you may use this power while unarmed (having picked up an appropriate rock etc.) using your unarmed damage. You may also use this attack at any time with a melee weapon you are holding… but it doesn’t return to you unless it would normally do so.
Target: One far away enemy
Attack:
Dexterity + level vs.  AC.
Hit:
Weapon + dexterity + constitution damage.
Miss: 
Damage equal to your level.

UNSTOPPABLE BOLT
Ranged attack
Daily
Recharge:
16+ after the battle
Free action, requires greatness
Trigger:
You reduce an enemy to zero hit points with a ranged weapon attack
Target:
One enemy that was in a group with, or farther away than, the triggering enemy
Attack:
Dexterity + Level vs. AC
Hit: Weapon + Dexterity damage
Miss:
Damage equal to your level
Adventurer Feat: You may also use this power if the triggering attack staggers an enemy.
Champion Feat: Recharge is now 11+
Epic Feat: As long as your attack staggers an enemy or reduces them to zero hit points, you may keep making this powers attack against enemies in the same group, or who are farther away from you.

CATCHING MICE
Melee attack
At-will
Quick action, requires greatness
Target:
One creature
Attack:
Strength + Level vs. PD.
Hit:
You grab the target.
Special:
You may use this power as a free action when an enemy attempts to disengage from you, by spending your greatness.
Adventurer Feat:
You may use a standard action on your turn to deal one-half of unarmed + constitution damage to a target you have grabbed.

INDOMITABLE
Greatness power
At-will (once per round)
Interrupt action; requires greatness
Trigger: You are subjected to a condition, or an effect a save can end.
Effect:
Roll a saving throw. On a success, you are not subjected to the condition, or you save against the effect.
Special: You may use this power when first subjected to a last-gasp effect, to make a free saving throw against it.
Champion Feat: You may use this power to save against an effect that lasts until the end of your or the triggering attacker’s next turn

TITAN SWING
Melee attack
At-will
Target:
Each enemy engaged with you
Attack:
Strength + Level – the number of targets vs. AC
Damage: WEAPON damage
Miss: –
Adventurer Feat:
Do damage equal to your level on a miss.
Champion Feat: Add your strength modifier to the damage on a hit.

GIANT STRIKE
Melee attack
At-will
Target:
One non-staggered non-mook enemy
Attack:
Strength +  targets Level vs. AC
Damage: WEAPON + Strength + Constitution Damage.
Miss
: Damage equal to your level.
Champion Feat: Instead of the targets level, you may add your level to the attack roll.

DIVINE STAMINA
Greatness power
Daily
Recharge:
11+ after the battle
Interrupt action; requires greatness
Trigger: You are damaged by an attack
Effect:
You heal using a recovery.
Adventurer Feat: You may use this power when you hit an enemy with an attack.
Champion Feat: Recharge is now 6+

3RD LEVEL POWERS

ECLIPSE SHOT
Greatness power
At-will (once per round)
Interrupt action, requires greatness
Special: You ordinarily use this power while holding a ranged weapon. When the escalation die is even, you may use this power while unarmed (having picked up an appropriate rock etc.) by spending  your  greatness. You may also use this attack at any time with a melee weapon you are holding… but it doesn’t return to you unless it would normally do so.
Trigger:
One nearby or far away enemy rolls for a ranged attack vs. ac that targets one creature.
Effect: Roll dexterity + level -2. If your roll equals or exceeds the triggering roll, the triggering attack has no effect. Otherwise, this power has no effect.
Champion Feat:
This power works against attacks that target PD.
Epic Feat:
This power works against attacks that can target one group of far away creatures, but you must equal or exceed the highest attack roll for this power to have any effect. If successful, this power complete negates the triggering attack.

INESCAPABLE DOOM
Daily
Recharge 11+ after the battle
Move Action
Special: You must not be engaged with any enemy
Effect: Place yourself next to one nearby enemy you can see, that you could have (eventually) reached normally—you move right where fate needs you to be, or you were there all along.
Champion Feat: Recharge is now 6+
Epic Feat: You may place yourself next to any enemy you can see.

JUDGEMENT
Melee or ranged attack
Daily
Special:
This must be your first attack this battle
Target:
One enemy you are engaged with (melee) or one far away enemy (ranged)
Attack:
Strength (melee) or dexterity (ranged) + level vs. PD
Hit: 
Weapon + Weapon + constitution + strength (melee) or  dexterity (ranged) damage, and half as much ongoing damage. You gain greatness.
Miss:
Half damage, and you regain the power during your next quick rest. You lose greatness and cannot regain it until after your next turn.

UNFINISHED STORY
Greatness power
Daily
Recharge:
11+ after the battle
Interrupt action, requires greatness
Trigger: Your hit points are reduced below 1.
Effect:
You do not fall unconscious, but continue to track your hit points, and make death saving throws at the end of each turn. You die when you reach negative half your hit points, or when you fail your fourth death saving throw this battle. You do fall unconscious if you lose greatness, or at the end of the battle if you are still below one hit point.
Champion Feat: Recharge is now 6+

BAT ASIDE
Greatness power
At-Will (once per round)
Interrupt action; requires greatness
Trigger: A melee attack that targets AC hits you.
Effect:
You take half damage from that attack.
Adventurer Feat: The power also triggers on an attack against PD.
Champion Feat:
The power also triggers on a ranged attack.
Epic Feat:
Once per day, you can use bat aside to take damage equal to the attacker’s level instead of half damage.

REND
Melee attack
Daily
Recharge:
16+ after the battle
Special:
You must spend your greatness.
Target: One enemy you have grabbed.
Attack:
Strength + Level vs. PD
Hit: Weapon + strength + constitution damage. On a natural even attack roll, the target takes ongoing damage equal to 1d3 times your level. On a natural roll of 16+, the target is weakened.
Miss: Damage equal to your level
Effect: The target is no longer grabbed by you, and gets a free disengage check.
Champion Feat: Recharge is now 11+
Epic Feat:
Once per day, you may reroll the attack roll for this power and choose either result.

5TH LEVEL POWERS

SUNDER
Melee or Ranged attack
Daily
Recharge: 16+ after the battle
Special:
You must spend your greatness
Attack:
Strength (melee) or dexterity(ranged) + level vs. PD
Hit:
Weapon + constitution +strength(melee) or dexterity(ranged). The target is also stuck (on an odd attack roll), dazed (on an even attack roll), or vulnerable (on a roll of 16+). One hard save ends all.
Miss:
 Half damage.
Champion Feat: Recharge is now 11+.
Epic Feat: You may add or subtract 3 from the result of this powers attack roll.

BATTER
Melee attack
At-will
Special: You must have a creature grabbed, that you can move while grabbing; requires greatness
Target: 1d2+1 enemies engaged with you except for the creature you have grabbed.
Attack:
Strength + level  –number of targets vs. PD.
Hit:
Half of Unarmed + Constitution damage. The creature you have grabbed also takes this damage on each hit.
Miss:-
Champion Feat:
This power now targets 1d4+2 enemies engaged with you.
Epic Feat: Add your constitution modifier to the miss damage.

HEAVENS LEAP
Greatness power
At-will (once per round)
Interrupt action, or a quick action on your turn; requires greatness
Effect:
If used as an interrupt, you fall safely to the ground. If used on your turn, you gain flight until the end of your turn.

SKY BLADE
Ranged attack
Daily
Recharge:
16+ after the battle
Target:
1d4+1 enemies
Special:
You must make this attack with a melee weapon you are holding. It returns to your hand after the attack is resolved.
Attack: Dexterity + level vs. AC
Hit:
Weapon + dexterity damage
Miss: Damage equal to your level.
Champion Feat: Recharge is now 11+.

7TH LEVEL POWERS

CATAPULT THOW
Ranged attack
Daily
Recharge: 16+ after the battle
Special:
You must have both hands free. Or if you have greatness, you must have a creature grabbed, that you can move while grabbing.
Target:
1d4+1 nearby enemies in a group.
Effect: If you made this attack with a grabbed, it is no longer grabbed by you and becomes an additional target in the targeted group.
Hit: Unarmed + strength damage, and the target loses its next move action. Allies engaged with the target take one quarter damage.
Miss:
Half damage. Allies engaged with the target take one quarter damage.

Champion Feat: Recharge is now 11+
Epic Feat:
This power can instead target 1d4+2 far away enemies in a group.

DEIFIC CHEAT
Close quarters power
Special: You may use this power only once per level.
Trigger: You die.
Effect: You return to life the morning after you died. You start the new day with one quarter of your hit points and recoveries, and all of your daily abilities expended. You cannot gain greatness until the turn after a non-mook enemy of your level or greater hits you with an attack.

Epic Feat: You may use this power to instead revive a dead ally.

9TH LEVEL POWERS

MOUNTAIN SPLITTER
Close quarters attack
Daily
Recharge:
16+ after battle
Special:
You must spend your greatness
Target: 1d3 groups of 1d3+1 nearby enemies.
Attack: Strength + level vs. PD.
Hit:
Weapon + strength damage. The target also takes weapon + constitution ongoing damage and is stuck (save ends both). Allies engaged with the target take one quarter damage.
Miss:
Half damage, and the target loses its next move action. Allies engaged with the target take one quarter damage.
Epic Feat: Recharge is now 11+

COMET SPLITTER
Greatness power
Daily
Recharge
:  11+ after battle
Interrupt action, you must spend your greatness
Trigger:
A creature attacks you or a nearby ally with an attack vs. PD or AC that can target more than one creature.
Target: The triggering creature.
Effect
: You move nearer to the triggering creature or targeted ally without provoking opportunity attacks. Roll constitution + level + the number of targets in the triggering attack. If your roll equals or beats the attacker’s highest roll, the  triggering attack misses you, misses the triggering enemy, and no longer targets any allies. If your roll is less than the highest attack roll, the triggering attack hits you and is a critical hit, and no longer targets any allies.
Epic Feat:
On a successful roll, the triggering enemy is instead hit by the triggering attack. On a failure, they are missed instead.

TALENTS FOR OTHER CLASSES

ELEMENTALIST
CHAMPION OF THE LAND
You gain the use of one stalwart power of your level or lower, and may improve it with feats up to your tier. Once per day when you end a battle with greatness, you may reroll the recharge roll for an Elementalist power.

Adventurer Feat: You may substitute wisdom for constitution when using stalwart powers.
Champion Feat: Gain greatness at the start of the next turn in battle when an ally rolls a 5 or 6 on an icon relationship roll with the High Druid.
Epic Feat:
Gain a second stalwart power.

FIGHTER
MAKE YOUR OWN FATE
You gain the use of one Stalwart power of your level or lower, and may improve it with feats up to your tier. You do not use the normal method of gaining or losing greatness.  Instead, you gain greatness when you hit with an even roll of 12+ on an attack and lose it when you miss with an odd roll of 11 or less on an attack. You may lose one fighter maneuver to gain one more stalwart power.

Adventurer Feat: Once per battle, you may spend greatness to reroll a flexible attack that hit.
Champion Feat:
 You gain the use of power stunt once per day.
Epic Feat: Gain another stalwart power.

PALADIN
HAND OF THE DIVINE
You gain the use of two stalwart powers of your level or lower, and may improve them with feats up to your tier.

Adventurer Feat: You may substitute Charisma for Constitution for any Stalwart power you possess.
Champion Feat: Gain an Icon Relationship point with the Crusader or the Priestess. You must stay within normal relationship maximums.
Epic Feat:
Gain another stalwart power.

SORCERER
ICONIC FIST
You gain the Stalwart’s unarmed attacks feature and may permanently gain one stalwart power slot of your level or lower in exchange for a sorcerer spell slot. You may improve stalwart powers with feats up to your tier. Once per day, you may spend greatness to instantly empower a sorcerer spell.

Adventurer Feat: Substitute Charisma for Strength while making unarmed attacks or using stalwart powers.
Champion Feat:  You may empower stalwart powers.
Epic Feat: You may permanently lose a second sorcerer spell slot to gain a stalwart power slot.

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